nevver:

The New Yorker

He walked out in the gray light and stood and he saw for a brief moment the absolute truth of the world. The cold relentless circling of the intestate earth. Darkness implacable. The blind dogs of the sun in their running. The crushing black vacuum of the universe. And somewhere two hunted animals trembling like ground-foxes in their cover. Borrowed time and borrowed world and borrowed eyes with which to sorrow it.

The Road
incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

I’ve discovered that working under a name other than the one in my passport—while an undeniable hassle in airports, hotels, and banks—is a marvelous way to dodge my inhibitions. It doesn’t say much for human psychology, I suppose, that such a simple-headed trick should work so well, but I’m in no position to be fussy. Writing is hard enough without the sin of pride.

John Wray on why he chooses to write under a pseudonym: http://nyr.kr/1oo6ogb (via newyorker)
book-aesthete:

Woman: in All Ages and in All Countries, vol. 2-10 (of 10) Philadelphia, Printed for Subscribers Only by George Barrie, [1907]
NUMBER 6 OF 7 COPIES “issued with watercolor vignettes on the sub titles”, from an overall edition of 1000 copies, Original watercolour vignette of a woman on each half-title, numerous plates, mostly printed in 4 states, without the additional portfolio of plates, publisher’s blue crushed morocco gilt, signed inside upper cover “bound by Barrie”, spines with peacock motifs in gilt and red morocco onlays, morocco doublures with elaborate borders of linked chains, peacock feathers and flower sprays in gilt and morocco onlays, the front doublure with central oval incorporating a hand-painted portrait of a woman in national dress, the lower one with central design of a naked woman standing on top of a globe, watered silk free endpapers, g.e., slipcases, 8vo,
B-A Note: Manybooks.com lists the ten volumes, and the texts are available for download there as well.

book-aesthete:

Woman: in All Ages and in All Countries, vol. 2-10 (of 10)
Philadelphia, Printed for Subscribers Only by George Barrie, [1907]

NUMBER 6 OF 7 COPIES “issued with watercolor vignettes on the sub titles”, from an overall edition of 1000 copies, Original watercolour vignette of a woman on each half-title, numerous plates, mostly printed in 4 states, without the additional portfolio of plates, publisher’s blue crushed morocco gilt, signed inside upper cover “bound by Barrie”, spines with peacock motifs in gilt and red morocco onlays, morocco doublures with elaborate borders of linked chains, peacock feathers and flower sprays in gilt and morocco onlays, the front doublure with central oval incorporating a hand-painted portrait of a woman in national dress, the lower one with central design of a naked woman standing on top of a globe, watered silk free endpapers, g.e., slipcases, 8vo,

B-A Note: Manybooks.com lists the ten volumes, and the texts are available for download there as well.

For young women just starting out in journalism today, it is perilously easy to fall into the trap of writing only about so-called women’s issues. … This week in particular, in the wake of Jill Abramson’s firing by the Times, is a good moment for women journalists to remember Nellie Bly, a flawed but still effective model who wrote about what she wanted instead of arming herself with the hammer she acquired in her youth and spending the rest of her career searching for nails.

Alice Gregory on the late-nineteenth-century newspaper reporter: http://nyr.kr/1k5PAcV (via newyorker)
goodpark:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover: “The covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”

goodpark:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover: “The covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”

Similes: Hoarse

Hoarse as the rustling of autumnal breeze. —Henry Brooke 

Hoarse as a raven. —Charles Reade 

Hoarse as warning prophets in an evil age. —Bayard Taylor 

ileolai:

#FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT

“When you’re creating your own shit, man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”

Miles Davis

(Source: chaboneobaiarroyoallende)