ckweek:

fishingboatproceeds:

My publisher.

I am a bookworm and I just swooned at this. I’m far more happy than I should be. 

ckweek:

fishingboatproceeds:

My publisher.

I am a bookworm and I just swooned at this. I’m far more happy than I should be. 

(Source: cayayofm)

If at any time you find it necessary to correct your brother, do not correct him with mud — never, on any account, throw mud at him, because it will spoil his clothes. It is better to scald him a little, for then you obtain desirable results. You secure his immediate attention to the lessons you are inculcating, and at the same time your hot water will have a tendency to move impurities from his person, and possibly the skin, in spots.

Mark Twain, Advice to Little Girls

There are no happy endings.
Endings are the saddest part,
So just give me a happy middle
And a very happy start.

Shel Silverstein, Every Thing on It 

(Source: larmoyante)

hawaiiancoconut:

Vintage books #1 , Seapoint. 

hawaiiancoconut:

Vintage books #1 , Seapoint. 

IT GENERALLY TAKES awhile to write a novel. Although there are authors who can write a quality book every year, they’re the exceptions; it’s more typical to spend three, five, or even seven years to complete a draft. If you’ve never attempted to write anything of a novel’s length, imagine having a friend or relative visit you for roughly that length of time, for three or five or seven years. Imagine a person, a person with whom you are not enjoying anything like traditional sexual congress, leaving their little hairs and toenail clippings in your sink, sprinkling their droplets of pee on your toilet seat, cluttering your surfaces with their weird pocket stuff, sticking things in the wrong cabinets, being underfoot and distracting you constantly for three or five or seven years. Let’s be honest: even if it was your favorite cousin, and even though you sort of invited him, after a year or so, you would owe it to yourself to give, at minimum, tacit consideration to murdering this person. This is the unique affliction of writing books: the endeavor is such that you can never entirely stop thinking about it. Picture the houseguest that is your novel, day after day, chewing cereal with his mouth open, his butt cratering the seat of your favorite armchair, and you will begin to understand.

Owen King

Yeah, what he said. 

(via robinwasserman)

penamerican:

Slideshow: Chinua Achebe reads at PEN’s 2008 Tribute to Achebe.

Click here to listen to Achebe read from his 1958 novel Things Fall Apart.

All photos © Beowulf Sheehan / PEN American Center

Descriptionari: Handy little site to help with descriptions

I just found this, and everyone else might already know about it, but! It’s essentially a collections of descriptions (in the form of quotes, lists of words and ‘thematic micro-stories’) that each center around a given theme.

So if you search for “crying” you’ll see user descriptions from literature and often their own writing as well. 

Of course there is an abundance of purple and poorly constructed prose. But there are also little gems like this, from Atwood’s Lady Oracle:

I never learned to cry with style, silently, the pearl-shaped tears rolling down my cheeks from wide luminous eyes, as on the covers of True Love comics, leaving no smears or streaks. I wished I had; then I could have done it in front of people, instead of in bathrooms, in darkened movie theatres, shrubberies and empty bedrooms, among the party coats on the bed.

And you can also contribute your own stuff if you’re so inclined.

Anyway, add it to your bookmarks right next to the Dictionary of Similes and before you know it, you’ll have 3467346 ways to describe a ‘dark and stormy night.’

The road to hell is paved with works-in-progress.

Philip Roth

(Source: tunebomb)